Personal Growth

Butterfly in Spring

Butterfly in SpringMedium: Acrylic

Size: 11 X 14, framed 14 X 17

Private collection

Butterflies have a great spiritual symbolism which comes from the transformation from caterpillar to this beautiful creature of grace and beauty. Butterflies are here to show us the path of freedom; freedom from our past and the transcendence of the soul.

You Are A Leader? Really?

WhoAreYouI’m relatively active on Facebook, and somewhat active on Twitter. I’ve made some great friends, deepened some existing relationships, gotten clients, and connected with a number of people in leadership communities who are active in social media. I’ve been impressed with quite a few people, and admire most of them.

I have even participated with 20 of them in writing a book about character-based leadership, and our wish to see changes in how people perceive their role in leadership.

Here is my dilemma; my struggle:

I know I am not perfect. I never have been. I slip up occasionally, and post things I think are funny – and I’ve inadvertently offended people. And, I have practiced what I coach, and I’ve learned from those situations, and I am much more mindful of the impression I can leave with others when I am not impeccable with my word.

Please bear with me when I ask this question:

How can anyone proclaim to be a leader, especially one who holds their character up as an example for others to follow, and post offensive statements on social media related to other people based on lies, assumptions and judgments about their religion, their race, their gender, and their character?

Leadership is about being non-judgmental, open-minded, diverse, compassionate, humble, caring, empathetic. Leadership is about communicating – listening, seeking to understand, being assertive rather than aggressive or passive-aggressive. Leadership is about seeking a win-win for everyone, and seeking the greater good. Leadership is about trust and accountability. And, yes, leadership is about setting an example.

I’m discouraged by some of my fellow leadership coaches and consultants.

Normally, I don’t say anything. But, you see, I’m also practicing being fearless and authentic – two more characteristics of leadership that I admire.

So, I have two additional questions I would like to ask:

What drives you to put statements out on Facebook and Twitter, or in the media, that are based on assumptions that are not factual and can generate hateful feelings in people who see them and trust you?

Based upon your definition of character, what stops you from being mindful of the consequences of your behavior?

Georgia Feiste, President of Collaborative Transitions Coaching, Inc., located in Lincoln, NE, and Phoenix, AZ, is a personal growth and leadership coach, writer, and workshop facilitator.  She is also a Usui Reiki Master and EFT practitioner.  Her passion is success grounded in purpose and passion, standards of integrity and priorities in life.  You can also find Georgia on her website, Collaborative Transitions, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.  

 

 

The Goals of Your Soul

goals of the soulI’ve been reading a book lately – off and on – about the mind of the soul. I have to smile, because at one point I thought that was a contradiction. What I had been learning was that the ego and the authentic part of you – your soul – was separate. Then I learned that in ancient Hebrew times, our ancestors believed that the heart and the mind were one.

Your soul!

So, in today’s jargon, how do you know the goals of your soul so that you might be completely authentic to who you are?

The goals of your soul are harmony, cooperation, sharing, and reverence for Life. When those goals become your goals, your personality is aligned with your soul. That is authentic power.” – Gary Zukav

Ah. So the goals of every soul are harmony, cooperation, sharing and reverence for Life?  I’d like to know everyone with these goals, wouldn’t you? Life would be wonderful! Perhaps most of us have forgotten what these four words mean, and that these are our goals – our purpose in life.

And we are back to purpose – I saw a posting on Facebook the other day that read – “Put your hand over your heart. It is beating. That is your purpose.”

Anita Moorjani, in her book, Dying to Be Me, says that our purpose is to live our life fearlessly, centering ourselves in the Universe’s unconditional love.

I’ve spent the last week concentrating on that. With each of my daily accomplishments couched in harmony, cooperation, sharing and reverence for life. In addition, lest I forget, I have been frequently reminding myself that I am loveable, just because I live. With what results you ask?

  • I have laughed out loud in delight more frequently than I ever have.
  • People have remarked on the love they see in my eyes.
  • My sweet spouse and I have been taking are to say exactly what we mean so there is no misunderstanding – with much less assuming on both parts. This makes for a peaceful marriage.
  • I have been highly productive.
  • I have enjoyed sharing what I have, regardless of need or a feeling of “should”.
  • Unfortunately, I still smacked the fly that was buzzing me in the back yard. I have not yet reached the point where I pick up the bug I don’t want in my house and put it out the backdoor.
  • I’m taking risks with my blogs, my actions, and my love that I might not have taken several weeks ago. Living my life fearlessly.

The saying “Be the change you would like to see”, attributed to Ghandi, occurs to me as I write this blog. I’ve heard that people don’t want to hear about me, so I’ve tried to teach by sharing what I read and the theory of personal growth and leadership. I’m not convinced you want to hear that either.

So – I’ve decided to fearlessly share what I’m practicing as I dare to “be the change I would like to see.” I invite you to share as well. Let’s create community, shall we?

 

An Ode To Turning 60

I have been thinking about how I feel about moving into my seventh decade of life. I remember how I felt when my mom and dad turned 60. I was 38 at the time, and that whole year was somewhat of a mid-life crisis for me. I’m not quite sure exactly why my parents hitting that magic age made me feel my mortality so much, but it did.  One of the major aspects of that year was that I really knew I wanted to make a difference in my world, and I started to pursue my own values and my spirituality with vigor. Somehow, I think that was a turning point for me.

I’m turning 60 tomorrow.  Strangely, I don’t think this birthday is impacting me as much as when Dad and Mom turned 60.  I don’t feel old.  Perhaps because I recognize that I love change – especially when I instigate it.  I love learning, and I think that helps keep me young.  My children keep me on my toes, even though they are close to the age I was when my parents turned 60.  Andi keeps me apprised of the joy of raising a baby, and  yet craving adult interaction at the same time.  Josef keeps me current on what is going on in the news, expressing his thoughts about books, movies, music, and philosophy.  My grandchildren – I’m sure I need say nothing more other than I love all three of them with all my heart.

I have accomplished much up to this point in my life.  I am a wife, mother, grandmother, daughter and sister.  I have touched a multitude of lives – hopefully for the best.  What I remember the most is not my work, which I did to the best of my ability, but the quality of my relationships and how much I learned from every person who has touched me.

Of course, I have realized that turning 60 is not old.  For me, it is opening up new vistas, and encouraging me to sweep away the stale, and often stinky, habits and patterns of my life, and make room for the new and exciting opportunities coming my way. Turning 60 is another turning point for me.  This time, it is one that does not bring anxiety with it, as did that turning point 22 years ago.

I wish I had known what it meant to be 60 when I was 38. But then, I would not have experienced the growth of the next 22 years that created the foundation of what is yet to come.

Today I spent with friends.  I left the house early, and moved from engagement to engagement – networking, sharing ideas, making plans and enjoying the relationship with dear people.  We are all getting older, and share the delight of adventure, the community of friends, singing the song of the soul, and the willingness to give of ourselves to create a moment, day or year of delight for someone else.

I’m excited about the future.  I’m eager for what is coming my way – new friends, new experiences, new freedom – even while keeping the best of what is here right now. I don’t know what tomorrow will bring – only that I will be surprised, delighted, inspired and encouraged to make the best of whatever it might be.

If you are still reading, thank you for enduring my rambling.  If you are 38 – know that life is amazing and wonderful and that the best is yet to be. Enjoy the time you have now, and don’t worry about the future. If you are 60 – I hope you are appreciating where we are right here and now, and are not worrying about the future.  And if you are 82 – you are blessed, and I’m looking forward to the experience of the next 22 years as I move day by day to join you.

Happy Birthday!  What a day it will be.

Coach Georgia

You Can Do Just About Anything If You Believe You Can

Have you ever felt like the world was against you?  Most of us have, even though many of us live in one of the richest countries in the world.  We feel like we have been short changed. We believe that if we were smarter, if our bodies were perfect, or if we had more money we could be successful.  We believe we could accomplish great things, if only things were different..

I firmly believe that if we have a passion for something, if we are willing to put in the effort rather than sit back and look for someone to take care of us, we can do just about anything.

I watched two videos today, and I’m not quite sure which one moves me the most. The first was of a young girl playing the piano in concert.  It was fascinating, and moved my heart.  She had no fingers on her right hand.  If you were just listening to her, you would not have known.

The second was a video of a young man who had lived on the streets since he was five.  He survived by peddling gum and sodas and sleeping in public toilets. Just listen to him!

I feel I can only share one video with you, and I am choosing to share the video of the homeless boy.  Please watch this in the privacy of your home.  It would be too loud for you to watch at work, because I guarantee you will want to turn the volume up on your computer.

What do you want to accomplish in your lifetime?

What legacy will you leave?

 

Georgia Feiste, President of Collaborative Transitions Coaching, Inc., located in Lincoln, NE, is a personal growth and leadership coach, writer, and workshop facilitator.  She is also a Usui Reiki Master and EFT practitioner.  Her passion is success grounded in purpose and passion, standards of integrity and priorities in life.  You can also find Georgia on her website, Collaborative Transitions, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.   Georgia may also be reached at (402) 304-1902 if you wish to schedule a 30 minute complementary consultation.

 

Practicing Self-Compassion

This week I am practicing having compassion for myself.  Connecting with the best of me; the person I am here to be.  It is not always easy, and sometimes I show up badly in my human interactions.

It is 2:30am, and I am irritated with another night of less than four hours of sleep.  Byron, aka Big Dog, has had another seizure, with a major loss of bodily functions. He is pacing, searching for something, whining and howling as he talks to us.  Trying to tell us what is going on with him.  I am insisting that Karl call the vet in the morning.  We need something to help Byron – Big Dog is refusing Reiki, getting up and moving as best he can when I place my hands on him; howling when I attempt it long distance.  My patience is stretched.

The lessons and opportunities here for me are similar to those that are offered up for millions of people across this world as they deal with family illness, trauma, babies with colic, and a myriad of other reasons for the pain of loss, lack of sleep, not knowing exactly what to do, and not liking the options in front of them.

Self-compassion is all about acknowledging your feelings, recognizing the pain and suffering, and the resistance to what is.  It is about giving yourself the same compassion you would give to someone else going through similar circumstances.   It is giving yourself a hug, and saying “I understand”.  It isn’t wallowing in the pain, but simply recognizing that it is there and you are dealing as best you can, showing up as you are meant to be.

Some of you might be thinking – this doesn’t measure up to what I’m going through, what my family is going through. It is a dog!

You will be right, it isn’t the same. Byron is a dog; and yet, a member of the family.  A sentient being who cannot readily share his feelings, his fears, and where it hurts.  He is my son’s dog – and I have not yet told Joe of the issues we are facing.  I needed to be sure before I brought that pain into his life.  He loves his dog, as do we.

And, so, I am practicing compassion for myself as I ready myself for the dawn of the day.  Calling the vet, deciding the best course of action, and sharing the news with our son so that he might come love and hold his dog (in hopes that we can get some medication to help Byron) or say good-bye as we wish him a peaceful and brilliant transition.

Self-compassion is a concept that many do not understand or have difficulty with.  They were brought up to be stoic – my husband ,self-critical – me, or to think that self-compassion is an excess of indulgence. Choosing to stay stoic, self-critical or resistant in an invitation to disaster as we face situations that are difficult.  The stress we create for ourselves is tremendous, leading to ramifications to our health.

Today – actually early morning – I am choosing self-compassion as I listen to Big Dog moan and whine as he begins to calm down.  He is no longer howling as only an Alaskan Malamute can.  It is good practice for me.  It helps me more readily and mindfully give compassion to those I have relationships with, and yes, even those I don’t.

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Georgia Feiste, President of Collaborative Transitions Coaching, Inc., located in Lincoln, NE, is a personal growth and leadership coach, writer, and workshop facilitator.  She is also a Usui Reiki Master and EFT practitioner.  Her passion is success grounded in purpose and passion, standards of integrity and priorities in life.  You can also find Georgia on her website, Collaborative Transitions, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.   Georgia may also be reached at (402) 304-1902 if you wish to schedule a 30 minute complementary consultation.